Lambda: using AWS SAM Local to test Lambda functions locally on Windows

AWS SAM Local is a “CLI tool for local development and testing of Serverless applications.” It uses Docker to simulate a Lambda-like experience. The docs explain well how to get started, and the GitHub repo has lots of samples as well. As of this writing, it supports python, java, .net, and nodejs. This is a quick post to show how to use it in Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and Docker For Windows. Installing on Windows The instructions recommend installing with npm. That didn’t work for me, giving me errors about file not found. I’m not sure if this is … Continue reading Lambda: using AWS SAM Local to test Lambda functions locally on Windows

Windows IPv6 slow-or-broken: resolved

Chocolatey slowness? When I originally posted about package management with Chocolatey, I mentioned two problems I had on a brand new laptop: 1) inability to download large packages; 2) general slowness when downloading. Turns out, these are not Chocolatey’s problems at all. Wait… Powershell too? I noticed when working in Powershell that curl, which just wraps Invoke-WebRequest, was taking a really long time. Simple commands were returning results like this: PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> Measure-Command { curl https://microsoft.com } Days : 0 Hours : 0 Minutes : 0 Seconds : 43 Milliseconds : 316 Ticks : 433164486 TotalDays : 0.000501347784722222 TotalHours : … Continue reading Windows IPv6 slow-or-broken: resolved

Goin’ back to Windows: Windows Subsystem for Linux

This is part of a series on moving from desktop Linux back to Windows. The first post is here. The previous post is here. In short: I would not have moved back to Windows had it not been for the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). It has made the move from Linux back to Windows so much easier because I can still do the things that I’ve been doing for years, and do every day, quick and easy and familiar: installing and updating development environments (Python, Go, nodejs), databases (PostgreSQL); interacting with source control (git); running apps and tests; running … Continue reading Goin’ back to Windows: Windows Subsystem for Linux

Goin’ back to Windows: small, fuzzy apps and compatability settings

This is part of a series on moving from desktop Linux back to Windows. The first post is here. The previous post is here. In the first post, I mentioned that one of the motivators for moving back to Windows was that I really liked the hardware of the Lenovo Yoga 920. I bought one of the “4k Ultra HD Touch Screen” models, not because I cared about the 4k but because it was overall better spec’d. I’m not even sure 4k is realistically perceptible, or useful, on a 14″ laptop. In fact, on Windows 10, it does have a … Continue reading Goin’ back to Windows: small, fuzzy apps and compatability settings

Goin’ back to Windows: package management with Chocolatey

This is part of a series on moving from desktop Linux back to Windows. The first post is here. The previous post is here. Windows software management: the current default state Three years ago, I wrote about moving from Windows to Linux for personal computing and development. Part of my frustration with Windows was around package management — installing, keeping up to date, and removing software. And part of my motivation for experimenting with moving back to Windows is the existence of what appears to be a serviceable solution for package management on Windows: Chocolatey. More on that soon. But … Continue reading Goin’ back to Windows: package management with Chocolatey